Have you got our numbers? If you like a bit of number crunching, or you're doing some research, have a look at the NZALS statistics. You can find out how many amputees there are in NZ and for which reasons.

About 1 person in 1,000 in New Zealand has lost a limb; that's around 4,400 amputees living in our communities.

Amputations result from two main causes: diseases such as diabetes or peripheral vascular disease; and accidents, particularly traffic accidents, but also industrial and farm accidents. Where disease is the cause, amputation is often necessary to save the person's life.

People with congenital disorders or birth defects, where one or more limbs are not fully developed, are not amputees in the full sense, but they do face similar difficulties and challenges.

There are four main types of amputation:

  • removal the leg above the knee (trans-femoral)
  • removal of the leg below the knee (trans-tibial)
  • removal of the arm above the elbow (trans-humeral)
  • removal of the arm below the elbow (trans-radial)

 

NZALS Statistics 2013-2014 (PDF, 100 KB)

Including all current patients' ethnicity, amputation levels and causes, gender and age, and new referrals as at June 2014.

 

NZALS Statistics 2012-2013 (PDF, 114 KB)

Including all current patients' ethnicity, amputation levels and causes, gender and age, and new referrals as at June 2013.

 

NZALS Statistics 2011-2012 (PDF, 94 KB)

Including all current patients' ethnicity, amputation levels and causes, gender and age, and new referrals as at June 2012.

 

NZALS Statistics 2010-2011 (PDF, 202 KB)

Including all current patients' ethnicity, amputation levels and causes, gender and age, and new referrals as at June 2011.